bike shops – Veldia http://veldia.net/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:39:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://veldia.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-92-150x150.jpg bike shops – Veldia http://veldia.net/ 32 32 LETTERS: Allow e-bikes on trails; turn on the lights in Colorado Springs | Opinion https://veldia.net/letters-allow-e-bikes-on-trails-turn-on-the-lights-in-colorado-springs-opinion/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://veldia.net/letters-allow-e-bikes-on-trails-turn-on-the-lights-in-colorado-springs-opinion/ Allow e-bikes on the trails Thank you for your recent article on e-bikes. As a 70-year-old, I really appreciate being able to get out and ride. I have enjoyed the Colorado Springs trails for over 27 years. Due to knee problems, I started riding an e-bike about four years ago. I’m so grateful that I […]]]>

Allow e-bikes on the trails

Thank you for your recent article on e-bikes. As a 70-year-old, I really appreciate being able to get out and ride. I have enjoyed the Colorado Springs trails for over 27 years. Due to knee problems, I started riding an e-bike about four years ago. I’m so grateful that I can ride as far as I want, no matter how steep the terrain. It’s not about how fast I can go; it’s about being a courteous cyclist and respecting other cyclists.

On rare occasions, when I pass other runners, I always warn them and avoid getting too close. I have never met a rider who was too fast or discourteous on an electric bike! It’s not uncommon for a rider on a human-powered bike to pass me unexpectedly and at a speed that seems to be over 20 mph.

From my experience, I think the trails should be open to e-bikes. I would be quite surprised if there were any complaints about e-bikers, especially those ridden by older people. Hopefully the decision to allow e-bikes on the trails will be based on information obtained from those of us who ride the trails. Perhaps bike shops could help gather information by providing a suggestion box or some other way to solicit opinions.

Bill Hill

colorado springs

The root cause of this problem

Regarding Seth Klamann’s article “Check in on kids”, here is my opinion. I raised two children as a single father, worked as a 911 paramedic and now as an emergency technician. My children are now adults and have children of their own. I raised them in the 1990s, and they did well. But, back then, we didn’t impose views like critical race theory and questioning a child’s sexuality on their young minds. Nor did we have a Ministry of Education fighting to keep the teachings of public schools secret and fighting against the transparency of educational platforms.

When a teenager is taught to ignore their parents’ upbringing and advice in the classroom and sometimes even told to report their parents to the authorities, how would anyone expect a child to mentally respond? I won’t name historical names, but I’m pointing the finger at our government as the root cause of this problem.

Cape Kaplar

colorado springs

Turn the lights back on

Re: The article “City working towards ‘smart’ streetlights” by Mary Shinn. Before the city adds additional functionality to our streetlights, they must turn all of these streetlights back on to perform their primary function. There are streets in our city that have 2 or 3 lampposts but are completely dark at night. I understand that we turned off half of our streetlights years ago to save money, but those days are over.

Let’s check those 29,000 or so lights to make sure they’re working properly. So let’s turn them all back on. Once they all perform their main function, we can add additional functionality.

David Geuting

colorado springs

tell people what they think

Many letters I have read in the Gazette purport to tell one group or another what they think or want. Bert Bergland’s letter of February 8 says that “the one on the left wants to reduce and definance”. It refers to the police. I haven’t voted for a Republican for any office since the 70’s, so I think that probably qualifies me as a “lefty”, and I don’t think so!

I know there are people who want to take funding away from the police, and it’s usually because they or someone they know has suffered at the hands of the police. I certainly understand their reasoning. I think the problem is that Republicans have been funding the police for years. They don’t say they want to defund the police, but their tax policies do just that. TABOR has been defunding the police for years!

We need more police and better training. We have to pay our taxes! We get what we pay for.

James Ash

colorado springs

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Devou Good is offering a $500 e-bike incentive rebate https://veldia.net/devou-good-is-offering-a-500-e-bike-incentive-rebate/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 20:35:00 +0000 https://veldia.net/devou-good-is-offering-a-500-e-bike-incentive-rebate/ The Devou Good Foundation is offering a $500 discount to residents of select communities on both sides of the river who purchase an e-bike after Feb. 15. (photo: provided) by Robin Gee Starting Tuesday, Feb. 15, people who live in the northern Kentucky river towns of Bellevue, Covington, Dayton, Ludlow, and Newport, and select Cincinnati […]]]>
The Devou Good Foundation is offering a $500 discount to residents of select communities on both sides of the river who purchase an e-bike after Feb. 15. (photo: provided)

by Robin Gee

Starting Tuesday, Feb. 15, people who live in the northern Kentucky river towns of Bellevue, Covington, Dayton, Ludlow, and Newport, and select Cincinnati zip codes, will be eligible for a $500 purchase rebate. of an e-bike, thanks to a grant program through the Covington-based Devou Good Foundation.

The privately funded organization focuses on projects that support the community, including those aimed at “improving active transportation.” In northern Kentucky, the foundation has worked with neighborhood groups to improve traffic safety and flow through its Vision Zero program.

In Fort Thomas, the organization has partnered with Chesapeake residents to adopt a slow streets program, and in Newport, the group is helping support ephemeral bike lanes in hopes they will become permanent.

Devou Good launched its Active Transportation Fund last year, setting aside funds to support bike lanes, cycling infrastructure, pedestrian safety initiatives and the new e-bike grant program.

What is an electric bike?

E-bikes are bicycles equipped with a battery-powered electric motor to provide “pedal-assist” power for climbing steep hills. President of the Devou Good Foundation Matt Butler said the additional power boost makes it easier to tackle the many hills in our area, which he hopes will encourage more people to ride.

“When it comes to e-bikes, what people will find is that it’s a lot of fun, and they’re more likely to ride their e-bikes than not. not get used to,” he said. With e-bikes leveling those daunting hills, “people will be drawn back to the fun they had as kids riding bikes, and they’ll rediscover that joy.”

With increased use, he says, comes a host of benefits.

“E-bikes reduce a rider’s carbon footprint, improve their physical and emotional health while eliminating road wear,” he said. “E-bikes are a key part of active transportation and creating a sustainable future. They emit 25g of CO2e per person per kilometer, while buses emit 110g and cars 240g.”

He said he hopes the program will add 100 voters who support the development of e-bike and bike-friendly infrastructure.

“Another reason we’re interested in getting more people to ride bikes is to have more people asking their local governments, demanding their local governments, to provide safe places to ride bikes.”

How electric bikes work

Butler said the small e-bike motor is a force multiplier. In other words, the rider first has to pedal to start the engine, but once it starts, it provides extra power that essentially levels out hills. Those who ride e-bikes still have to pedal, so they’re still getting exercise, but hills are easier. With that, Butler said, the hope is that people will get out and ride more often and go further.

The batteries are small and light, and can be removed and charged at home overnight, much like a cellphone or laptop, he said.

“The batteries draw minimal electricity. And the great thing is that the range is extended,” Butler said. “I have an e-bike. I can ride about 30 miles round trip. My bike gets me to most of the meetings I need to attend. Obviously I don’t go all the way to Sharonville, but I can go about 10-12 miles.”

He said he faces some pretty steep hills to get anywhere from home, but with the e-bike it’s an easier and more enjoyable ride.

Most mainstream e-bikes cost between $1,500 and $4,000, and today almost every major bike manufacturer offers a range of e-bike models. The $500 discount can be applied to purchases made at physical bike stores and online stores. One of the reasons the foundation chose the city’s river corridor and a particular set of Cincinnati neighborhoods was both access to riding locations and proximity to bike shops in those areas.

The first modern e-bikes hit the market in the United States in 1998 and interest has grown steadily. According to data from the NPD Group, the 2020 e-bike retail market in the United States was estimated at $547 million, more than double the market in 2019. Industry analysts estimate that more than 12 million electric bikes will be sold in the United States between 2020 and 2023. Global sales figures are expected to bring in $130 million over the same period.

How to get your discount

“There’s been a lot of interest already,” Butler said. “…So if people are interested, I would encourage them to get ready to buy their bike and submit their rebate request as soon as possible. [after February 15]because the fund is limited to $50,000.”

Reimbursement is open to people living in Covington, Newport, Bellevue, Dayton, and Ludlow, or Cincinnati ZIP Codes: 45202, 45203, 45204, 45205, 45206, 45219, 45214, 45220, 45223, and 45226.

Here are the steps for the refund:

  • Buy your e-bike in a store or online after February 15 and keep the receipt.
  • Go to the Discounts on Devou Good Foundation electric bikes Web page.
  • Complete the application, which includes a seven-question survey, and upload your receipt.
  • Once approved, the Devou Good Foundation will send you a check for $500.
  • After 90 days, the foundation will send you another survey to complete. This one will ask you how you used the bike. Some of the questions, Butler said, will ask whether having the bike has changed your transportation choices. Have you used your e-bike for running errands? Did it allow you to go further in less time, opening up more possibilities for shopping or working?

Where to ride

The Foundation collects the e-bike data in hopes that it will support the expansion of bike-friendly and pedestrian-friendly policies and projects in the region.

Currently, trails and places to ride safely are dotted around our area. On the north Kentucky side of the river there is the River Commons Trail and the Licking the Riverfront Greenway Trailsbut Butler noted that these, like similar trails across the river, are in “pieces and parts”.

Cyclists can venture to Cincinnati via the Purple People Bridge or the Suspension Bridge to connect with the Ohio River Trailalso in the sections at present, he says.

While people on both sides of the river are actively working on plans, Butler said the big challenge in northern Kentucky is the number of individual municipalities along the river and building connections across them.

Devou Good sponsors a “Map of low-stress bikes” available through Three-state trials which provides information on trails and low-speed streets. Made by cyclists, the map indicates the streets to avoid and the recommended streets.

The Devou Good Foundation was founded by Rebecca Gensler, Butler’s wife, who established the fund to support and work with nonprofits and municipalities seeking to improve the quality of life for residents. For more information, visit Devou Good Foundation website.

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Electric Bikes, a Popular Item at Lincoln Bike Shops | State and Region https://veldia.net/electric-bikes-a-popular-item-at-lincoln-bike-shops-state-and-region/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 06:01:07 +0000 https://veldia.net/electric-bikes-a-popular-item-at-lincoln-bike-shops-state-and-region/ “I think it’s the freedom and the ability to go that far. You can explore so much more distance than you can on a normal bike. They are not new. One of Lincoln’s oldest bike shops sold its first electric bike nearly 15 years ago, a Trek 900. “And from the start, there were more […]]]>

“I think it’s the freedom and the ability to go that far. You can explore so much more distance than you can on a normal bike.

They are not new. One of Lincoln’s oldest bike shops sold its first electric bike nearly 15 years ago, a Trek 900.

“And from the start, there were more smiles than anything I had ever seen,” said Kris Sonderup, owner of Cycle Works. “It didn’t matter if you were 15 or 60.”

But most of its buyers are closer to their sixties, cyclists who want to keep riding but are having a harder time.

“These let you go for a bike ride, and you’re not tired after an hour. Whatever challenge you might have, they keep you rolling.

For years, Sonderup’s e-bike sales have been steady but slow — his store usually kept one to two on the sales floor — but they started picking up several years ago.

Last week, he had nearly 20 e-bikes ready for sale. “It’s been growing about 50% a year, jumping more and more. We have really grown year by year.

Speedy Pete also started small.

After Long’s first try, he visited other bike shops, researched online and talked to e-bike owners. In 2018, it began selling e-bikes at its four Lincoln QP Ace Hardware stores. And when he built a new store the following year, he dedicated about 1,500 square feet of the building to a stand-alone e-bike store.

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Alexandria is going crazy for Wheel Nuts Bike Shop! https://veldia.net/alexandria-is-going-crazy-for-wheel-nuts-bike-shop/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 09:26:28 +0000 https://veldia.net/alexandria-is-going-crazy-for-wheel-nuts-bike-shop/ Ron Taylor (right) with his Wheel Nuts team at the Montgomery Center site. (Photo courtesy of Ron Taylor) By Margaret Townsend Alexandria, VA – Ron Taylor, the owner of Wheel Nuts Bike Shop, opened his doors nearly 24 years ago. At that time, the competitive cyclist was working with the Fairfax County Park Authority and […]]]>
Ron Taylor (right) with his Wheel Nuts team at the Montgomery Center site. (Photo courtesy of Ron Taylor)

By Margaret Townsend

Alexandria, VA – Ron Taylor, the owner of Wheel Nuts Bike Shop, opened his doors nearly 24 years ago. At that time, the competitive cyclist was working with the Fairfax County Park Authority and as the director of First Street Fitness in Old Town North.

Many of Taylor’s customers knew of his cycling background. They often asked for advice on local bike shops, but by the late 1990s there were no shops to recommend.

When Taylor saw that a 1940s Sunoco station at the corner of N. Washington and Montgomery streets was being converted into a dry cleaner, he thought that might solve the bike shop’s problem. With the help of his family and friends, Ron transformed the service bay into the first incarnation of Wheel Nuts Bike Shop.

Taylor bought several used bikes to fill his shop, set up a small repair bay, used an old wooden door as a workbench, and revived his father’s 1960 Sears supercharger. Soon after, neighborhood kids began asking if Taylor would fix their bikes; their parents soon followed.

After about a year, one of Taylor’s loyal customers asked for help finding a new bike. Taylor contacted a bike manufacturer and began stocking new bikes for sale while renting and repairing bikes and busying himself with his job at the fitness center.

Wheel Nuts Bike Shop has been selected three times as one of America’s Best Bike Shops by the National Bicycle Dealers Association. (Photo courtesy of Ron Taylor)

The store quickly experienced a growth spurt. So Taylor moved on to a space at the Montgomery Center, quit her job at the fitness center, and hired her first full-time employee, one of the kids who had frequented the store for the first time.

Today, Ron Taylor has five employees and a loyal fan base. It has been selected three times as one of America’s Best Bike Shops by the National Bicycle Dealer’s Association and as Green Business of the Year by the Alexandria Chamber of Commerce. The store expanded further when the pandemic hit as locals sought out socially distanced outdoor activities.

The effects of the pandemic have been complicated mixes of growth and exhaustion, success and failure, but for Taylor and his wife and co-owner, Trina, the store continues to run just as well as their bikes, and they hope it will continue. road.

ICYMI: In 2021, over 1,760 people helped volunteer in Alexandria, donating over 62,000 hours



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Colorado AG charges eight men in burglaries at bike shops across the state, including Boulder County https://veldia.net/colorado-ag-charges-eight-men-in-burglaries-at-bike-shops-across-the-state-including-boulder-county/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://veldia.net/colorado-ag-charges-eight-men-in-burglaries-at-bike-shops-across-the-state-including-boulder-county/ Eight men were indicted by a state grand jury and charged with using stolen vehicles and large rocks to break into and rob bike shops across the Front Range, including several in Boulder County. According to a statement from the Colorado Attorney General’s office, Kevin Acosta-Larkin, Austin Butler, Gerald Garcia, Maurice Leday, Gregory Melina, Salvador […]]]>

Eight men were indicted by a state grand jury and charged with using stolen vehicles and large rocks to break into and rob bike shops across the Front Range, including several in Boulder County.

According to a statement from the Colorado Attorney General’s office, Kevin Acosta-Larkin, Austin Butler, Gerald Garcia, Maurice Leday, Gregory Melina, Salvador Mena-Barreno, Jason Quijada and Adrian Rocha-Chairez have all been charged with 227 counts. in aggregate, including violation of Colorado law. Organized Crime Control Act, first degree aggravated motor vehicle theft, second degree burglary, theft and criminal mischief.

The indictments stem from an investigation called Operation Vicious Cycle which involved a series of crimes involving 29 burglaries at bike shops, 22 car thefts and multiple attempted burglaries and robberies from Fraser to the Denver metro area of December 2019 to June 2020.

According to the statement, the men would plan the burglaries using Facebook Messenger. In groups of up to four, the men would then steal either a box truck or van and ram it into the doors or windows of a bike shop, or they would smash the front windows with large landscaping rocks or other tools.

Police said the men then stole high-end ATVs and transferred the stolen goods to sell out of the country, possibly to Mexico.

“Together with our law enforcement partners, we have dismantled this multi-layered criminal enterprise that has harmed multiple businesses and nonprofits in mountain communities and the Denver and Boulder metropolitan areas,” Attorney General Phil Weiser said in a statement. “We will hold these individuals accountable for their actions and the damage they have caused to victims and our communities.”

The defendants allegedly stole $985,000 in bicycles and $258,000 in vehicles while causing $231,837 in property damage.

Six businesses were robbed in Boulder County, including Boulder Cycle Sport in Boulder, Redstone Cyclery in Lyons and Cenna Custom Cycles in Longmont.

According to the statement, all cases were filed in Boulder District Court.

“After speaking with bike shop owners, I know that these burglaries and thefts have caused significant damage to victims and to our communities,” Boulder District Attorney Michael Dougherty said in a statement. “This indictment is the direct result of a united and tireless effort to end a multi-jurisdictional theft operation. The District Attorney’s Office appreciates our strong partnerships with the Boulder Police Department, the FBI and the Office of the Attorney General.

“Our office remains committed to ensuring that those implicated in these property crimes are held fully accountable for their actions. I want to thank Attorney General Weiser for pulling together this team effort and fighting for the safety of the community.

Boulder cycling sport

Photos of Boulder Cycle Sport front window damage after a reported burglary on December 18, 2019.

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How to attract and keep employees in your bike shop https://veldia.net/how-to-attract-and-keep-employees-in-your-bike-shop/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://veldia.net/how-to-attract-and-keep-employees-in-your-bike-shop/ A version of this article originally appeared in the September issue of Bicycle Retailer & Industry News. ASHEVILLE, NC (BRAIN) – The dwindling pool of job applicants this summer has created another challenge for an industry that is still navigating a turbulent supply chain. While some in the industry blame rising unemployment benefits for depressing […]]]>

A version of this article originally appeared in the September issue of Bicycle Retailer & Industry News.

ASHEVILLE, NC (BRAIN) – The dwindling pool of job applicants this summer has created another challenge for an industry that is still navigating a turbulent supply chain. While some in the industry blame rising unemployment benefits for depressing the job market, the reasons there are fewer applicants for jobs – and the rise in the problems that cling to it – are as varied as the factors that contribute to supply chain chaos.

Salary, career growth potential, health benefits, COVID-19/Delta variant fears, and work/life balance are factors that give candidates more time before applying for jobs in the industry, retailers and suppliers told BRAIN. Many have said that the pull of the in-store lifestyle that once appealed to employees is no longer as strong as it once was. And the pandemic has given many a chance to reprioritize and consider other career opportunities.

Taylor Essick, whose bike-hauling company Kitzuma Cycling Logistics took on the task of filling vacancies after starting up nearly a year ago, noted a watershed power shift between employee and employer.

“The candidate is more empowered these days to ask for what they need, which is damn cool, if you ask me,” Essick said. “There are challenges for me as an employer, but I’m also encouraged that it seems people are getting paid more fairly these days, and they have more options in terms of what they do. they can search for and what they It’s just a broader market for employees or candidates looking for a job.They can hold their own in the negotiation.

Kitzuma’s workforce – with openings for driver-tech, customer experience and logistics positions – is approaching 30. “We don’t pay anyone less than $16 an hour, but you don’t get the type of response you would get for $20 an hour of work.”

Chad Mihalick, president of Malakye – an online job posting and networking site for businesses and individuals working in the outdoor and lifestyle fields – noted the change.

“Companies in every industry we touch are struggling to find people to fill roles in every department and at every level of experience,” Mihalick said. “We think it’s because people are taking time to figure out what’s good for this next phase of their lives and the increased unemployment benefits are helping buy them time to figure it out.”

Kent International CEO Arnold Kamler said that while his office was not directly affected, the Kent, South Carolina plant experienced labor shortages. But the challenges facing Kent’s wholesale customers have had a bigger impact.

“A lot of our small and medium customers don’t have enough employees, and our large customers lack warehouse staff, which causes a lot of delays in our shipments,” Kamler said.

Are profits to blame?

The labor shortages causing these delays are a growing national problem, which comes down to expanded and more generous unemployment benefits. An Axios Morning Consult poll released in July reported that 1.8 million Americans said they had turned down jobs because of enhanced benefits that began with the March 2020 CARES Act in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Last March, the American Rescue Plan Act extended these benefits until September 6. In July, 26 states cut those extra benefits early in a bid to get people back to work.

But not all observers agree that benefits are at the root of the employee shortage.

“It has nothing to do with unemployment,” retorted Bob Phibbs, CEO of The Retail Doctor, a New York-based retail consultant. “Good people all have jobs. That’s the problem. And they’re not looking to change right now. There’s a lot of market forces right now, and a lot of bike shops aren’t training, and it depends a lot on the owner. Remember that people leave owners. They don’t leave businesses. If you have high turnover, you have to look and say what training am I doing, and what is the environment I provide. Anyone worth their salt should pay “higher wages”.

“If McDonald’s starts at $15 an hour, your bike shop better get to $20-$25 if you really value them. If you really believe in paying them, training them, and holding them accountable, then you’ll get it back. If you think of employees as disposable and complain about how hard it is to find people, well, it’s hard to get people to work in retail.”

Lawyer Jim Moss, who represents bike and accessory makers, said the rising cost of daycare to keep people at home should not be overlooked. “On top of that, the number of child care centers that are left has gone down significantly,” Moss said. “A lot of them went bankrupt.”

However, an industry source who did not want to be identified said unemployment benefits are a factor, as is fear of contracting COVID-19.

“If you have a job that pays as much as you earn unemployed, then people don’t want to go to work,” the source said. “Because they can just do that sitting on the couch. People are scared to go back to the office. They’re rethinking their lives, they’re rethinking where they’re spending their time and what’s really important. And it all together has been driving crazy. “

Is throwing money at it enough?

Offering more money would help attract more applicants, but for some smaller retailers, it comes down to markups.

“Companies need to increase their margins because if we do more, we can retain people longer,” said Michael Boone, owner of Magic Cycles in Boone, North Carolina.

And for others, it’s about doing more work themselves to get things done right and in a timely manner. Like Francisco Cornelio, manager and chief mechanic at N+1 Cyclery in Framingham, Massachusetts. He said hiring a mechanic this year has been particularly difficult. He hired one that didn’t work out, and that experience left him frustrated.

“I can’t trust anyone who claims to know bikes anymore,” said Cornelio, whose shop pays $18 to $20 depending on experience. “They end up making me work more hours revising their jobs. … I quit for the rest of the year. We’ll see next year and see who’s responsible enough by then.”

Finding that competent and efficient mechanic continues to be the unicorn that many retailers continue to seek, especially these days. Chris Koos, owner of Vitesse Cycle Shop in Normal, Illinois, since 1979, said his most pressing challenge was finding experienced mechanics and builders.

While demand for services and bicycles is on the rise, at least one bicycle brand, which did not want to be identified, is wary of general wage increases and the expansion of the workforce during the construction boom. bike. “The only thing I would say is that the challenge of increasing compensation and benefits in the midst of growth is not knowing if that growth will continue at the same pace.”

But it doesn’t have to be all about salary. Kill them with kindness, some say. Kat Minks, who with her husband owns two Jonny Rock Bikes outlets in Minnesota, said fostering a family atmosphere can be just as important to keeping staff happy.

“If you’re going to be in the retail business — and I can’t speak for all bike shops — our store is best equipped for quality of life,” said Minks, whose locations are in Bloomington. and Hopkins.

“We are a family ourselves. We understand that. We don’t make our employees work until 10 p.m. The last hours for our stores are 8 p.m. And this year we don’t even do that because that we couldn’t find enough cover so we close at 7pm”

This type of environment is not limited to corporate retail. “We try to treat employees like family,” Kamler of Kent said.

Patrick McGinnis, president of HLC North America, agreed that the work environment is especially critical these days in attracting and retaining employees.

“We can only pay so much because we have obligations to the company and to shareholders, but what we can do is create the best possible environment and really care about your employees the best you can and give their families first,” McGinnis said.

Of course, the days of stores relying strictly on perks, like industry discounts and running the latest high-tech equipment first, won’t be enough to attract applicants. Building a loyal and effective workforce has become more difficult and costly, as one industry employer who did not want to speak out publicly concluded.

“You have to pay more; you have to include more benefits. We had to up our game on benefits and salary, and allow for some flexibility.”

It’s a strategy that has helped Jim Mincher maintain a stable workforce over the past two years. Mincher, owner of Two Wheeler Dealer in Wilmington, North Carolina, hasn’t had a furlough in two years and has even added employees over the past year.

“Pay well and treat employees well, and they stay with you,” said Mincher, who employs 22 people and has been in the industry for 47 years. “Have fun at work, but take it seriously. Keep your customers happy too.”

And when it comes to grooming managers to provide long-term career opportunities, the retail side of the industry is in trouble. “Just being able to try to find a direction to grow our business has been difficult,” Minks said. “We’ve tried a few managers or we’ve had people who we thought could become managers who ended up leaving for a number of reasons. You just have to bring in people who can see the bike industry as an industry that has a ton of potential” was difficult.

Proper training is one of the most important facets of employee success and retention, Phibbs said, adding that owners shouldn’t view previous bike experience as the end of everything. “There are a lot of bad people out there who have good experience. The days of putting an ad and a guy and girl showing up who understood the bike market are probably over. But that doesn’t mean you you can’t hire someone who’s done fashion, or done automobiles, or a million other things, and then train them.”

Mihalick’s company has become more aggressive in its efforts by adding a recruiting team to connect job seekers to positions that match their qualifications. “And it produces results,” he said. “People are getting the carrot put right in front of them.”

Phibbs offers candid advice to retailers looking for good candidates.

“Sitting there and complaining and talking to the media and telling your buddies it sucks to be you isn’t going to get anyone anywhere,” he said. “Because new hires will figure this out faster than anyone. You’re an entrepreneur. Get it.”

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Mundelein bike shop owner is moving on – but the shop and his name will remain https://veldia.net/mundelein-bike-shop-owner-is-moving-on-but-the-shop-and-his-name-will-remain/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://veldia.net/mundelein-bike-shop-owner-is-moving-on-but-the-shop-and-his-name-will-remain/ A Mundelein bike shop will live on despite the impending departure of its namesake owner. Ray Ladewig, founder and operator of Ray’s Bike & Mower, 612 E. Hawley St., announced this summer that he was selling the 11-year-old store and moving to Michigan. The shop was purchased by Lakemoor area resident Keith Gerstung. He will […]]]>

A Mundelein bike shop will live on despite the impending departure of its namesake owner.

Ray Ladewig, founder and operator of Ray’s Bike & Mower, 612 E. Hawley St., announced this summer that he was selling the 11-year-old store and moving to Michigan.

The shop was purchased by Lakemoor area resident Keith Gerstung. He will continue to operate under his longtime moniker.

“I’m delighted to see this continue,” said Ladewig, who has lived in Mundelein most of his life and ran for mayor in 2017.

Gerstung, who is new to the bicycle and small motor retail industry, took over on Sept. 1 and is enjoying the work — and meeting Ray’s many regular customers.

“The people are great,” he said. “They are very, very nice.”

Ladewig, 61, started the business after losing his job at a metal stamping company during the Great Recession. He always liked bicycles and small motors and started repairing them at home.

“I started in my garage, just to see if it was worth doing,” Ladewig recalls. “It just took off.”

He quickly moved into space on Hawley and has been servicing and selling bikes, lawn mowers, snow blowers and other equipment there ever since.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

The business thrived earlier in the COVID-19 pandemic, Ladewig said. Bike shops were considered essential to the economy as many people needed them to get around.

Now, however, new models and parts are hard to come by due to manufacturing shortages. A large rack near the front of the store that should be filled with new bikes is empty.

Ladewig, however, did not sell the store because of the pandemic. He has long had a fondness for Michigan, and his daughter, Maddie, is a senior at Hope College in Holland, Michigan.

So he and his wife, Natalie, move there.

“I never thought about moving. I grew up here,” Ladewig said. “But you know what? You don’t have to end here.

Rather than opening Ray’s Northeast, Ladewig expects to return to work in the metal stamping industry.

“They’re begging people to come back to work,” he said.

In a Facebook post, Ladewig expressed her affection for her customers.

“We loved owning and operating Ray’s Bike & Mower and certainly couldn’t have experienced the magic without the great customers and friends of the company,” said Ladewig. “We will definitely miss (and) cherish the memories made here.”

Gerstung came to Ray after some time as a maintenance worker with Wauconda Unit School District 118. He has worked in engines for a long time, including as a U.S. Navy and in the automotive industry.

“Every job is a new challenge,” said Gerstung, 57. “And no job is exactly the same.”

Although Gerstung said he will likely change the store’s name one day, it will remain at Ray’s for the foreseeable future.

“I don’t want to alienate the customers. They’re used to this place,” he said. “And that’s fine with me. I don’t have a big ego.”

]]> Best Bike Shop 2021 | Goods and services https://veldia.net/best-bike-shop-2021-goods-and-services/ Tue, 17 Aug 2021 11:08:39 +0000 https://veldia.net/best-bike-shop-2021-goods-and-services/ First place: Powers Bike Shop 3119 Williamsburg Road308-1847powerbmx.com Second place: Carytown Bicycle Co.Third place: Agee’s bikes Honorable mention: Outpost If you don’t know what BMX means, it can be hard to understand why Powers Bike Shop took the top spot for bike shops in a place like Richmond, which has a good share of independent […]]]>

First place:

Powers Bike Shop

3119 Williamsburg Road
308-1847
powerbmx.com

Second place: Carytown Bicycle Co.
Third place: Agee’s bikes
Honorable mention: Outpost

If you don’t know what BMX means, it can be hard to understand why Powers Bike Shop took the top spot for bike shops in a place like Richmond, which has a good share of independent bike shops. BMX is short for bike motocross, a sport centered on fast racing on off-road tracks using a bike that is lighter and smaller than a road bike or mountain bike. To be clear, Powers Bike Shop only sells and services BMX bikes, one of maybe 10 nationwide that is solely dedicated to BMX.

Powers Bike Shop owner Chad Powers started riding BMX in 1996 and by 2004 – at the age of 20 – had opened his eponymous shop. This is where BMX enthusiasts as well as those new to the sport can visit a BMX paradise. As well as bike sales, the store does repairs and offers a healthy dose of BMX bonding and advice.

“Because we only sell, repair, and service BMX-style bikes, we’re a pretty niche market,” Powers says. “That makes it super enjoyable because we build lasting relationships with our customers.” Word of mouth and social media help spread the gospel of BMX.

Calling himself an owner and “doer of everything,” Powers acknowledges the shop wouldn’t be where it is without his experienced staff, including Pedals the dog. “The best part of having the store is being able to keep everyone in the sport of BMX, which we all love. Plus, the store gives the town a strong foundation for our BMX scene to thrive.

As for why people are drawn to BMX over more conventional cycling, Powers thinks he’s figured out its appeal in his 25 years.

“The most important thing is that you can literally be whoever you want and do whatever you want on a BMX bike,” he says. “It gives you that freedom.”

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Pewaukee Bike Shop Becomes Dealer For Water Electric Bike Startup https://veldia.net/pewaukee-bike-shop-becomes-dealer-for-water-electric-bike-startup/ Fri, 09 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://veldia.net/pewaukee-bike-shop-becomes-dealer-for-water-electric-bike-startup/ VeloCity Cycling has a demonstration area for the Hydrofoiler XE-1 at Lake Pewaukee. Photo courtesy of VeloCity Cycling. Pewaukee-based bike shop VeloCity Cycling now carries a water e-bike that behaves like a motorcycle, operates like an airplane, and travels on water. The half-bike, half-plane invention, called the Hydrofoiler XE-1, uses similar technology to the catamarans […]]]>
VeloCity Cycling has a demonstration area for the Hydrofoiler XE-1 at Lake Pewaukee. Photo courtesy of VeloCity Cycling.

Pewaukee-based bike shop VeloCity Cycling now carries a water e-bike that behaves like a motorcycle, operates like an airplane, and travels on water.

The half-bike, half-plane invention, called the Hydrofoiler XE-1, uses similar technology to the catamarans competing in the America’s Cup, said Scott Hoggatt, owner of VeloCity. It was developed by a startup based in New Zealand Manta5.

Rather than wheels, the XE-1 uses a set of hydrofoils that function like wings in water. When riders pedal to propel the bike forward, water passes over these wings to create lift, similar to how airplanes fly.

“It’s actually a little more like riding a motorcycle than riding a bicycle,” Hoggatt said. “You have to do more counter-steering and it’s more turning while leaning.”

The XE-1 can reach a top speed of 13 mph and a cruise speed of between 7 and 8 mph. The water bike has a 460 watt motor and operates like a pedal bike in that there is no boost unless the rider is pedaling, and no throttle.

Click on here for images of the Hydrofoiler XE-1, which costs $9,200.

Hoggatt says he’s been following Manta5’s progress since the company launched a Kickstarter campaign in 2017. Manta5 began shipping the Hydrofoiler XE-1 to dealers outside of New Zealand last year and Hoggatt, who received his shipment of six Hydrofoiler bikes in June, says he’s the only dealer in the Midwest.

Despite its proximity to Lake Pewaukee, the Hydrofoiler is the first personal watercraft product VeloCity has carried since opening five years ago. Hoggatt says he plans to sell more watersports products, but much like the bike industry, personal watercraft products like canoes and kayaks have been in short supply lately due to supply chain disruptions. supply.

“A lot of bike shops are pretty much landlocked and we have the lake right there, so it’s a very natural fit for us,” Hoggatt said of the store, which is across from Lake Pewaukee.

Manta5 is limiting its Hydrofoiler XE-1 production to batches of 300, Hoggatt said, adding that its next shipment will arrive in early August.

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Conte’s opens its first bike store in the Charlotte, NC market https://veldia.net/contes-opens-its-first-bike-store-in-the-charlotte-nc-market/ Thu, 08 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://veldia.net/contes-opens-its-first-bike-store-in-the-charlotte-nc-market/ Virginia Beach, Virginia – East Coast Virginia retailer, Conte’s Bicycle Group, LLC, is pleased to announce its first entry into the Charlotte, NC market with the opening of its 15th store, at 9815 Rea Road. The space should feel familiar to many in Charlotte’s cycling community, and for good reason. For the past 5 years […]]]>

Virginia Beach, Virginia – East Coast Virginia retailer, Conte’s Bicycle Group, LLC, is pleased to announce its first entry into the Charlotte, NC market with the opening of its 15th store, at 9815 Rea Road. The space should feel familiar to many in Charlotte’s cycling community, and for good reason. For the past 5 years the Rea Road location has been home to the NC Velo community.

“The cycling community in and around Charlotte is among the most vibrant, active and passionate we have ever encountered,” said David Conte, co-director of the company. “We are excited to get to know Charlotte’s cycling community as we settle into our new home.”

“I’m thrilled to see Conte continue what we started,” Carter Utzig owner NC Velo said. “Conte brings a wealth of experience serving all types of cyclists and a market influence that will serve our cycling community well.”

Conte’s® will sell Specialized, Cannondale, Pinarello, BMC and Orbea bicycle brands, a full line of Rapha cycling apparel and accessories, a professional Retul® Fit studio, and services and rentals.

ABOUT CONTE’S BIKE SHOP®. Since 1957, Conte’s has been a trusted bicycle sales and service retailer. The company has 15 stores in Virginia, Washington, DC, Florida, North Carolina and will open Q2-2021 in Atlanta, Georgia. The company has been recognized 12 times as one of America’s Top 100 Bicycle Retailers, was honored by Tidewater Women Magazine as a recipient of the Ladies Choice Award in the Bike Shops category, was named “Retailer of the Year” by the Retail Alliance, and a 2016 Bicycle Retailer and Industry News selection as one of only 6 nominees in the United States for National Bicycle Retailer of the Year. More information can be found at: www.contebikes.com.

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